Our Blog

Redefining Conservation

May 13, 2021|By Will Allen
Photo by Stacy Funderburke.

As a follow up to the Executive Order to commit to conserving at least 30% of our lands and waters by the year 2030, the Biden Administration released the preliminary report of the National Climate Task Force entitled “Conserving and Restoring America the Beautiful,” which recommends a ten-year campaign to conserve and restore lands in the U.S. Will Allen, a Senior Vice President of The Conservation Fund, discusses how this campaign shapes the nation’s conservation priorities and how the Land and Water Conservation Fund and Great American Outdoors Act remain key to implementation.

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May 3, 2021|By Dr. Liz Rutledge
Photo by Tim Smith.

If you’ve ever been to the Great Smoky Mountains, you’ve probably driven on Interstate 40, which bisects the Pigeon River Gorge in North Carolina and Tennessee. Something you may not have thought about on this drive, is that wildlife also needs this corridor to live. Unfortunately, this busy interstate has seen a 43% increase in traffic since 2005, which has led to more animals being hit and killed by vehicles. The Smokies Safe Passage initiative is building a new solution to help change this—saving the wildlife that need to take the dangerous journey across I-40.

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April 26, 2021|By The Marlborough Community Coalition
Photo by Ivan LaBianca.

Welcome to Marlborough. This vibrant community in the southeast section of Kansas City, Missouri is home to about 10,000 people and covers five connected neighborhoods spread over two and a half square miles. Today, Marlborough residents can meet at their community center, enjoy walking on more than two miles of consecutive sidewalks connecting three different greenspaces, and let their children run and climb at the playground. This urban community’s struggles with stormwater and sewer flooding, trash dumping, lack of greenspace, and general neglect have been greatly improved over the last decade, thanks in great part to the efforts of the Marlborough Community Coalition.

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April 22, 2021|By Claire Robinette Cooney
Photo by Jay Brittain.

Today, on the 51st annual Earth Day, we hope you can get outdoors and remember what inspires you about nature. To celebrate Earth Day, your online gift will be matched dollar-for-dollar today 4/22 and tomorrow 4/23!

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April 15, 2021|By The Conservation Fund
Photo by Whitney Flanagan.

At The Conservation Fund, we work all year long to protect and uplift success stories about nature, but this month we are particularly excited to celebrate Earth Day with many of our partners in communities across the country. Here’s a short list of some events that we hope inspire you to think about your local environment and how it fits into the larger global network. Let’s all get outdoors this week and do some good!

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April 12, 2021|By Larry Selzer
Pat Noonan and Rich Erdmann

Something important happened in 1973. Yes, Secretariat won the Triple Crown, and the Endangered Species Act was signed into law. The Sting, starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford, was released to great acclaim, and in what clearly was one of the most profound actions of the year, Martin Cooper of Motorola placed the first public cell phone call to a rival engineer at Bell Labs. But something else happened in 1973 that also was profound, and that was when the Genius met the General. 

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April 6, 2021|By Bobbi Reierson

As we look forward to celebrating Earth Day later this month, we also want to celebrate the donors that help make our work possible. We couldn’t do this work without them! Hear about what motivates our supporters to give to The Conservation Fund on Earth Day and all year long.

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April 5, 2021|By Eric Wuestewald
Blakeley Bluff overlooking the Tensaw River. Photo by Beth Maynor Finch.

Fort Blakeley in Alabama is the most important Civil War story you’ve likely never heard. Due to the land’s historical and ecological value, a significant portion of the battlefield—where U.S. Colored Troops resoundingly defeated Confederate forces in April 1865—was permanently protected in 2020. Learn more about the incredible history and ecological importance of this site and how we protected it.

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March 29, 2021|By The Conservation Fund
Photo by Jerry Monkman

Technology will play a critical role in the fight against climate change, but that’s not enough. In this recent article featured on Our Daily Planet, our CEO and President Larry Selzer shares his thoughts about how we must shift our traditional understanding of “technology” to include both promising manmade solutions AND naturally existing solutions like forests to remove harmful carbon from the atmosphere.

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March 22, 2021|By Eric Wuestewald
The Conservation Fund’s Resourceful Communities program has long worked with unsung heroes in rural areas working to sustainably redevelop their communities. The incredibly creative and impactful work of these grassroots groups is carried out every single day to address the social justice, economic and environmental needs in their communities – just because it’s the right thing to do.

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March 8, 2021|By The Conservation Fund

It’s Women’s History Month, and we are excited to celebrate the amazing work of women who are helping protect our planet each and every day. From fighting fires and climate change, to ensuring the outdoors is a more inclusive space for all—these women are making conservation history across America. Each of these women were nominated by members of our own staff because they were inspired by them. We know their stories are sure to inspire you.

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March 5, 2021|By Aleemah Ali
Photo by Kelsi Eccles.

Aleemah Ali, our 2020 Charles Jordan Intern, was inspired to launch the Community Art Project after researching how parks can benefit urban communities, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Her project combines community engagement and creative expression to safely draw the community outdoors into two Parks with Purpose in Atlanta. Her internship might be over, but her bright future is just getting started!

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March 3, 2021|By Eric Wuestewald
Photo by Caroline Legg/Flickr.

Since 2017, The Conservation Fund has partnered with the Minnesota National Guard at Camp Ripley to keep forested wildlife habitat intact and prevent development within three miles of the military facility’s border. That distance acts as a key buffer for numerous species of wildlife—including a significant population of golden eagles. The National Eagle Center in Wabasha, MN has tracked the migratory patterns of those eagles throughout the northern U.S. and Canada and put together an interactive map of their locations.

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March 1, 2021|By The Conservation Fund
Off-Farm Income podcast with Matt Brechwald

America’s farmers are some of the greatest stewards of the land we have. They live on the land, they’re livelihood depends upon it, and caring for and sustaining it long-term is in their best personal and economic interest. And while farmers haven’t always liked the term “conservation,” there are many creative ways that agriculture and environmentalism can work hand in hand to ensure a more sustainable farming future.

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February 22, 2021|By Kristie George
Photo courtesy U.S. Archives.

In celebration of Black History Month, we recognize the achievements of African Americans and their contributions to our nation, as well as their ongoing struggle for freedom and equality. In our third post in the series African Americans in Conservation, we invite you to learn more about some of the properties, parks, and places with ties to African American history that we have helped protect.

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February 17, 2021|By Will Allen
Photo by Joe Klementovich

With the recent Executive Order from the Biden Administration to commit to conserving at least 30% of our lands and waters by the year 2030, what does that really mean in the context of land conservation over the next decade? Will Allen, Senior Vice President of The Conservation Fund, discusses the potential implications of this 30x30 initiative and how best to think about its aspirations.

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February 12, 2021|By Ann Simonelli

The saying “there are always more fish in the sea” doesn’t ring true for one of America’s most critically at-risk species. Each year, populations of the endangered Central California Coast coho salmon remain low despite efforts to improve aquatic habitat. Less fish in the water means less fish in “dating pool” which causes more inbreeding and genetic defects that further threaten populations. Something more needed to be done to help the coho flourish in California, but what?

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February 1, 2021|By Kristie George


In celebration of Black History Month, we recognize the achievements of African Americans and their contributions to our nation, as well as their ongoing struggle for freedom and equality. There are many African Americans, both past and present, who have contributed to preserving the landscape, history, and stories of this nation. In our second post of the series African Americans in Conservation, we look to our past to inspire a better future by honoring those who have paved the way for Black conservationists.

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