Oregon

By the Numbers:

96,373 acres saved
  • Over 23,000 acres have been protected in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management.
  • More than 79,000 acres have been protected to benefit Forestlands.

 


Featured Projects: Oregon

Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

Encompassing a diverse array of habitat types, from the high, dry deserts of the Great Basin to the wet,...
Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

Long fascinated by what lay west of the Mississippi River, President Thomas Jefferson in 1803 commissioned Captain Meriwether Lewis...

More Projects: Oregon

Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

Encompassing a diverse array of habitat types, from the high, dry deserts of the Great Basin to the wet, lower-elevation forests of the Pacific Coast, Oregon’s Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument stretches across more than 54,000 acres in southwest Oregon, just north of the Oregon/California border.  Located at the crossroads of the Cascade, Klamath and Siskiyou mountain ranges, this is the first national monument created solely for its biological diversity—and there’s a lot of it. Often called the “Galapagos of North America,” this rugged region is home to more than 3,500 plant and animal species, many found only here. Visitors are welcome to explore the monument’s rugged backcountry, and the best way to do so is on the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail, a 2,650 mile trail extending from Mexico to Canada. The Conservation Fund’s Role Beginning in 2012, The Conservation Fund and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), which manages the monument, endeavored to protect the largest remaining privately held property within the monument’s boundary, approximately 6,570 acres owned by Hancock Timber Resource Group. The Fund began purchasing land from Hancock Timber and transferring it in phases to BLM for permanent protection, as funding became available. In 2014, we made significant headway with the transfer of 930 acres that contains a popular stretch of the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. This project received overwhelming support from Congress, which provided funding through the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), Hancock Timber Resource Group, the Pacific Crest Trail Association and Friends of Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument. To date, more than half of the original property has been protected.{igallery id=8053|cid=18|pid=1|type=category|children=0|addlinks=0|tags=|limit=0} Why This Project Matters This collaborative conservation effort will enhance habitat connectivity for wildlife and expand public recreational access in the monument. Recreation opportunities include hiking, camping, fishing, horseback riding, fishing, hunting, cycling and various winter sports. It will also allow the BLM to eliminate much of the fragmentation within the monument, enabling better stewardship and landscape-level protection of at-risk lands. Oregon Cascade Siskiyou National Monument Encompassing a diverse array of habitat types, Oregon’s Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument stretches across about 62,000 acres in southwest Oregon. In 2012, we conserved part of the largest remaining privately held property within the monument’s boundaries. Watch this video to learn more about this beautiful American landscape.
Learn More Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail Press Release Article: Medford Mail Tribune Places We Work:...
Gilchrist State Forest

Gilchrist State Forest

In Klamath County, Oregon, about 45 miles south of the town of Bend, a former timber company town and forest have a new lease on life as Oregon’s first new state forest in almost 70 years. The Gilchrist State Forest, named for the timber family that owned the property for most of the 20th century, was dedicated in June 2010. The new state forest owes its creation to creative funding partnerships between the Oregon Department of Forestry, the Oregon Lottery and The Conservation Fund. The state purchased the initial 43,000 acres of former Gilchrist Timber Company land in 2009 with $15 million in Lottery-backed bonds. At the same time, The Conservation Fund purchased multiple parcels totalling 25,000 acres adjacent to the new forest, retaining them until funds became available for a future purchase by the state. That transfer commenced in 2014, paving the way for both tracts to be managed by the Department of Forestry as a single state forest unit. Why This Project Matters Fragmentation is emerging as a major threat to private forestlands in Oregon and elsewhere. The commitment to create the new state forest kept intact land that otherwise would likely have been sold in many smaller parcels, with lost opportunities for multi-use forest management. The Oregon Department of Forestry will manage the land to provide a broad range of benefits over the long term, including wildlife habitat, timber harvesting that will provide jobs and revenue to support local government services, and public access for recreation. “Forests are a part of Oregon’s identity and essential to Oregon’s economy and well-being. Even during challenging times...we need to make investments in our state’s economic and environmental future, and that is what we are doing...with the dedication of this new state forest. The Gilchrist lands have been treasured in this part of Oregon for decades. Thanks to the support and vision of the community, the Board of Forestry, The Conservation Fund and others, we can celebrate the beginning of a great new era for these forests.” —Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski Learn more Gilchrist State...
Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

Long fascinated by what lay west of the Mississippi River, President Thomas Jefferson in 1803 commissioned Captain Meriwether Lewis to explore the Missouri River to its source, then establish the most direct water route to the Pacific Ocean. Lewis selected his friend William Clark to join him on the expedition as co-captain. Together with a crew of more than 30 people, Lewis and Clark headed west. At the mouth of the Columbia River, on the present-day border of Oregon and Washington, Lewis and Clark and their Corps of Volunteers for Northwest Discovery reached the Pacific Ocean in December 1805. They spent the next three months wintering here before returning home. The National Park Service established the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park here on the shores of the Columbia River to commemorate the culmination of the expedition and the explorers’ winter encampment at Fort Clatsop. Our Role In 2004, we purchased more than 920 acres from Weyerhaeuser. Designated one of the nation’s top conservation priorities by the National Park Service, the property includes land critical to the construction of the Fort to Sea Trail, which will connect the Fort Clatsop National Memorial to Sunset Beach State Recreation Area and the shores of the Pacific Ocean. Thanks in part to support from the Centex Land Legacy Fund, we protected more than 1,000 acres for addition to the park in 2005. This effort included land critical to the Fort to Sea Trail and Clark’s Dismal Nitch. Dismal Nitch marks Lewis and Clark’s dramatic arrival at the Pacific Ocean. In 1805, the Corps of Volunteers for Northwest Discovery spent six days trapped along the rocky shoreline near the mouth of the Columbia River. Members of the Corps battled thunderstorms, wind and high waves before they abandoned most of their supplies, buried their canoes and sought shelter in the cedar forest. Why This Project Matters In 2003, in honor of the bicentennial celebration of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, the Fund embarked on a major campaign to commemorate this legendary journey by protecting open space, river corridors and resources associated with the passage. Through our Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Initiative, we have helped conserve more than 25,000 acres along the famous route. This includes the land protected at the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park in Oregon and...