What We’ve Accomplished

In a defining moment for the Pineywoods region, T.L.L. Temple Foundation, International Paper and The Conservation Fund permanently protected more than 19,000 acres of hardwood forest and wetlands in East Texas, known as Boggy Slough, at the end of 2013. The land was protected through a conservation easement, donated by the T.L.L. Temple Foundation. International Paper will continue to own and manage the land, but its activities on the property are restricted to protect the land’s environmental value.

It is an idea that was sparked nearly ten years ago, spurred by the Temple family, the Pineywoods community and The Conservation Fund, regarding the critical need to protect the Neches River.

Located west of Lufkin, Boggy Slough contains some of the oldest and most ecologically significant hardwood forest habitat in East Texas and spans 18 miles of river frontage along the Neches River. For decades the area has been managed as a wildlife and forest management research and demonstration area, providing habitat for white-tailed deer and eastern turkey as well as numerous ducks, songbirds and fish.

“There is no land more significant or more important to the future of the Neches River, the wildlife or character of East Texas than Boggy Slough. We are grateful to T.L.L. Temple Foundation for donating the easement to The Conservation Fund and to International Paper for being such an excellent steward of the land,” said The Conservation Fund’s CEO, Larry Selzer.

Why This Project Matters

The challenge to protect America’s forests and rivers has never been more urgent. Yet with champions like the T.L.L. Temple Foundation and support from the Temple family, we are well prepared to continue our charge. Already, The Conservation Fund has responded by conserving more than 2,000 acres and 175 river miles of public and private lands along the Neches River.

Boggy Slough




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Press Release: T.L.L. Temple Foundation, International Paper And The Conservation Fund Announce Landmark Forest Conservation Effort To Protect More Than 19,000 Acres In East Texas