The Conservation Fund in the News

November 17, 2014
Josh Schonwald, TIME Magazine, Time.com 18 November 2014 — When you hear the term “sustainable seafood,” you might envision a fisherman pulling catch from a pristine sea. But a few weeks ago, the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch, arguably the world’s most influential arbiter of seafood sustainability, gave its highest stamp of approval to three companies that are about as far away from that fishing idyll as possible.

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August 21, 2014
Chelsea DeMello, The Journal, HampshireReview.com 22 August 2014 — SHEPHERDSTOWN- Sunday Morning began like a trip to another world, as dozens of scientific representatives geared up safely in blue and white space uniforms to tour the Freshwater Institute to see the facility’s progress on food production sustainability.

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July 16, 2014
James Wright, Senior Editor, SeafoodSource.com 17 July 2014 — Salamone of Wegmans hasn’t given up on the idea of fish farms positioned in close proximity to key markets. The 68-year-old veteran said he wishes he were 30 years younger so he could see the industry evolve to a point that may seem like a fantasy today. “Ten years from now a company like Wegmans could raise its own fish on land somewhere,” he said. “That is the future for land-based aquaculture.”

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May 13, 2014
Whitney Pipkin, Bay Journal, BayJournal.com 14 May 2014 — Salmon skins glisten in the waters below as three men wait, nets in hand, for the right catch to swim near the surface. The fish, grouped into one corner of an expansive pool, flop against its surface as the nets swoop in, splashing water that’s conspicuously salt-free onto the metal platform. This, of course, isn’t the wild, where 2-year-old Atlantic salmon like this rarely venture south of the Connecticut River and have seldom been spotted in the Chesapeake Bay. This is The Conservation Fund’s Freshwater Institute, located nearly 80 miles inland in Shepherdstown, WV.

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April 17, 2014
Whitney Pipkin, The Washington Post, WashingtonPost.com, 18 April 2014 — Still have farmed salmon crossed off your short list of eco-friendly fish? A local version that’s available for a limited time in the Washington area could temporarily rewrite your rules. Most farmed salmon are raised in open nets or pens in the ocean, where their waste and potential to introduce parasites, diseases or non-native fish to the wild present serious environmental concerns. The Freshwater Institute, a program of the Arlington-based Conservation Fund, has been trying another way.

March 17, 2014
John Randolph, FlyFisherman.com 18 March 2014 – Can wild Atlantic and Pacific salmon be saved from extinction if floating open-net-pen fish farms are replaced by chemical- and disease-free, closed-cycle farms on land? The idea sounds too good to be true to an editor/writer who for more than 30 years has been following the first-promising and highly promoted birth of industrial floating fish farms from Norway, to Scotland, Ireland, the Faroe Islands, the Canadian Maritimes, British Columbia, and Chile. It has been a failed promise. The new hope is land-based, closed-containment systems for fish production.

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February 28, 2014
Summerfelt and Christianson, World Aquaculture Magazine, March 2014  – The Aquaculture Innovation Workshop #5 – An International Summit on Fish Farming in Land-Based Closed-Containment Systems was hosted by The Conservation Fund Freshwater Institute, Tides Canada (TC), the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (GBMF) and the Atlantic Salmon Federation (ASF) at the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) in Shepherdstown, WV, 4-6 September 2013. This international summit provided an opportunity for aquaculture producers, scientists, engineers, aquaculture industry suppliers, regulators and investors to communicate progress on the technical, biological and economic feasibility of culturing fish – particularly salmon – to food-size in land-based closed-containment systems.

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February 26, 2014
Christine Pratt, The Wenatchee World, 27 February 2014  —  BAKER FLATS - Healthier fish, 70 percent less fresh water use, easier care and maintenance, cleaner water.  At a time when fisheries biologists are tasked with improving efficiency and reducing the cost of raising and releasing young salmon, an experiment undertaken by the Chelan County PUD in 2008 is turning heads around the region.

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