The Conservation Fund in the News

August 3, 2016
David Cobb, Chattanooga Times Free Press, 3 August 2016 – Nature enthusiasts should go ahead and familiarize themselves with the name Denny Cove, because the 685-acre parcel of Marion County wilderness will soon be a staple of Southeast Tennessee's outdoor lexicon.

The Access Fund and Southeast Climbers Coalition announced their acquisition of the property on Monday and are diving immediately into a work list that could turn the area into one of the region's premier rock climbing destinations.

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July 27, 2016
Louise Wrege, Harbor Country News, 27 July 2016 – The search for how human waste is ending up in Lake Michigan got a little help recently from two four-legged “detectives.”

Kenna, a golden retriever, and Sable, a German shepherd mix, from Environmental Canine Services in East Lansing and Maine, spent a week sniffing out the sources of the waste in several small streams between Stevensville and the Indiana line.

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July 27, 2016
Coustal Courier, 27 July 2016 – McIntosh Sustainable Environment and Economic Development, based in Darien, has received a grant from the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities to implement the Sustainable Forestry and African-American Land Retention program.  

This program is an effort to promote forest health and productivity and to help stem the loss of African-American-owned rural land.

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July 18, 2016
Karen Chavez, Asheville Citizen-Times, 18 July 2016 – The Conservation Trust for North Carolina recently purchased the 50-acre Open Branch Headwaters property in Jackson County adjoining the Blue Ridge Parkway, which will soon be part of a brand new park within the parkway.

The property, near Parkway Milepost 452, three miles north of Waterrock Knob, rises to 5,400 feet in elevation and contains rare spruce-fir habitat and provides important watershed and viewshed protection.

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July 18, 2016
Lisa P. Jackson, GreenBiz, 18 July 2016 – Editor’s note: The following is excerpted from a speech, as prepared for delivery, given Friday by Lisa P. Jackson, vice president, environment, policy and social initiatives  at Apple, to Law Seminars International’s Natural Resource Damages Conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico. It was the first time Apple has talked publicly about the legal construct of its forestry projects, both in the United States and China.

We believe paper, like energy, can be a renewable resource. So we’re constantly looking for ways to lower the paper footprint that we use in our packaging. And we’ve made a commitment to zero out that impact by using paper more efficiently, increasing recycled paper content and sourcing paper sustainably..

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July 16, 2016
Opinion by Bill Holman, The Charlotte Observer, 16 July 2016 – One hundred years ago this month, one of the worst natural disasters in our region’s history devastated communities from Asheville to Fort Mill. The Great Flood of 1916 was the result of two hurricanes saturating the Southern Appalachian Mountains and causing the Catawba and French Broad Rivers to dramatically overflow. Landslides swept away homes, dams burst, lives were lost, railroad and highway bridges vanished, lumber and textile mills were destroyed and the Lake Wylie dam collapsed.

In addition to the tremendous rains, a rapid land use change – the loss of forested watersheds – greatly aggravated the damage.

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July 8, 2016
Angus M. Thuermer Jr., The Charlotte Observer, 8 July 2016 – Wyoming Game and Fish Commission accepted a 364-acre gift from The Conservation Fund on Thursday keeping a “bottleneck” open on the longest mule deer migration path in the Lower 48.

The property near the outlet of Fremont Lake just outside Pinedale will be named after the conservationists who worked to preserve it. The property will honor the memory of Luke Lynch, a Conservation Fund employee, who died in a ski mountaineering accident on Mount Moran in 2015.

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June 29, 2016
Rocky Mount Telegram, 29 June 2016 – Project Momentum Inc., a local nonprofit agency founded in 2005, has received a Creating New Economies Fund grant of $10,000 from The Conservation Fund’s Resourceful Communities program to help fund the MAPScorps project in Nash and Edgecombe counties.

MAPScorps is a program that pairs local youth in the area with science-oriented university students. Working in teams, MAPScorps youth will walk every block of their communities, observing, collecting, cataloguing and analyzing data from the businesses and organizations in the community

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