The Conservation Fund in the News

March 28, 2022
Zayna Syed, Arizona Republic — This Arizona community wanted the former Rancho Vistoso golf course become a nature preserve. So they got to work. Eventually, they raised $1.8 million and worked with The Conservation Fund to purchase the property.

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February 9, 2022

The Conservation Fund’s Freshwater Institute and Mountaineer Food Bank teamed up to provide over 4,000 meals of locally-raised salmon fillets to West Virginians in need.

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December 24, 2021
Susan Sharon, Maine Public Radio — Around the world, the push is on for large-scale conservation. As an example of how this can work, Tom Duffus of The Conservation Fund points to rural Oxford County, Maine, which includes part of the White Mountain National Forest and the Appalachian trail.

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December 16, 2021

Noregs Fiskerihøgskule ved UiT Noregs arktiske universitet har fått 28 millionar frå Forskingsrådet til prosjektet CandRAS. No skal kompetansen på landbasert fiskeoppdrett hevast i heile landsdelen.

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November 28, 2021
Dana Hedgpeth, Washington Post — "It’s about honoring their ancestral rights,” said Blaine Phillips, a senior vice president at The Conservation Fund."

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October 28, 2021
Jeff Kart, Forbes — Up until recently, 70,000 acres of forestland in northern Wisconsin was the largest, privately-owned, unprotected block of remaining forest in the state. The Conservation Fund has purchased the land for an undisclosed price. But the value is sort of priceless.

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September 28, 2021

SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.V. — Fueled by increased global demand for salmon and the opportunity to help salmon farmers accelerate development to meet this demand, The Conservation Fund’s Freshwater Institute, an internationally-renowned research and development program focused on recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS), and Cargill, a global leader in solutions for animal feeds, announced a multi-year agreement to develop, evaluate and enhance feeds for the growing land-based aquaculture industry.


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August 20, 2021
Larry Selzer, The Hill — Without question, climate change is the greatest global threat of our time, taking a toll on countries around the world with devastating wildfires, dangerous weather patterns and record-breaking heatwaves. We see now that our health, economies and global stability are threatened by this crisis. 

Among the best and most effective strategies available now to combat climate change are those that protect our natural lands, especially our existing forests.


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