December 31, 2014| Resourceful Communities


About the Creating New Fund Economies Fund

Resourceful Communities’ small-grant program, the Creating New Economies Fund (CNEF), provides direct investment in community-based efforts. Seed money supports a range of projects: eco- and heritage tourism, youth conservation programs, farmers markets, alternative energy production and more. Additional information for applicants follows. Submit questions to smallgrants@conservationfund.org.

A portion of CNEF funds are available to help rural United Methodist Churches (UMCs) strengthen food ministries. UMCs are encouraged to contact a Faith and Food Coordinator, Justine Post (jpost@conservationfund.org) or Jaimie McGirt (jmcgirt@conservationfund.org), or email smallgrants@conservationfund.org to discuss potential projects.


FOR CNEF APPlicants

  • Click here to view important dates for the 2020 Creating New Economies Fund grant cycle.
  • Click here to view Frequently Asked Questions about the 2020 Creating New Economies Fund grant cycle.
  • Click here to view the Creating New Economies Fund list of grantees.
  • Click here for sample completed budget.

 

For CNEF Grantees


online application




Additional Resources

Virtual Trainings

  • Click here to view virtual learning opportunities and trainings for our community partners hosted by Resourceful Communties

background checks

  • Click here to learn more about obtaining county-level background checks in North Carolina

Considerations for new community garden projects

  • Click here for some key questions to ask before digging in.

EVALUATION TOOL FOR GARDEN PARTNERS

  • Click here for practical steps and tools to evaluate the triple bottom line impacts of your garden program.
  • Watch this demonstration for help navigating the website.

GUIDE FOR LIMITED-RESOURCE FARMERS

  • Click here to learn more about technical assistance, business and legal, networking and learning, and financial assistance for limited-resource farmers

Triple Bottom Line

  • Need help understanding the triple bottom line, a requirement for all funded projects? Check out the video below and learn more by clicking here. 

PROJECT BUDGETS AND Working with a Fiscal Agent

  • If your organization is not a nonprofit and you are working with a fiscal agent:
    • Click here to learn more about fiscal agents.
    • Click here to download a sample Memorandum of Understanding.
    • Please be sure to include non-cash support or in-kind support for your project.  Learn more here.
    • Questions about cashing checks?  Download this helpful guide.

TRIED and tested Rural Health Ideas

  • Click here to visit Try This NC and learn about rural health initiatives from our partners

Corporate Giving Guide

  • Click here to learn about grants and giving programs available in NC and nationwide, including funding priorities and sample applications.
December 31, 2014| Programs
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, plaga blandit mara utrum mara comis ne, et lobortis exerci humo nisl praesent brevitas et. Aliquip qui verto pertineo eum jumentum sudo elit luptatum. Plaga consequat augue plaga in velit eu pagus enim euismod incassum esse. Enim loquor autem vero te, in et saepius ventosus typicus. Minim, wisi consectetuer wisi adipiscing nimis dolor epulae defui, adsum defui venio in iaceo.
December 31, 2014| Resourceful Communities

Our emphasis on the triple bottom line means that Resourceful Communities engages in work and with partners that represent a broad range of issues – renewable energy, youth leadership development, eco-tourism, cultural preservation and more.  We recognize that some issues call for special attention because they are innovative, represent critical need, and support The Conservation Fund’s broad mission of working land protection and economic development.  Our targeted initiatives advance innovative solutions for our most economically- and socially-distressed communities.

North Carolina ranks in the top ten most food insecure states, with significant rates of poverty, farm loss and food deserts.  Two of our current initiatives, Healthy Eating, Active Living and Food and Farm, address these serious trends.  By employing our three primary program strategies of training, direct investment and networking, we are increasing low-income individuals' and families' access to healthy food and opportunities for recreation.  We also help small farmers connect with new markets, better growing strategies and hard-to-reach resources.

Through these initiatives, we have supported SNAP/ EBT access at local markets with targeted technical assistance on securing and implementing equipment and targeted outreach to low-income community members and effective vendor education to support sales to SNAP recipients.  Other projects include community gardens and trail building, training for youth and veterans in agriculture entrepreneurship, a chop-and-bag project that provides cafeteria-ready produce to rural schools and more.  Convenings and peer learning visits support awareness of trends related to these issues; connections to peer educators and other resources; and skills to replicate effective strategies that garner real community change.

In addition, we are working with agency partners to advance Community Forestry.  Many landowners and small municipalities own property that provides critical habitat; can improve water quality; offers outdoor education and passive recreation opportunities; and can generate sustainable revenue.  Through workshops and technical assistance, we are helping develop partnerships and stewardship plans to ensure the best use of forest resources.  

Resourceful Communities is also developing our Growing an Outdoor Generation initiative to help people of color and low-income communities connect with the outdoors. By connecting low-income youth of color and rural youth with environmental/outdoor education field trips, STEM-based curriculum programs, and natural-resource based professional development opportunities, we’re helping create new environmental stewards and addressing economic and social inequities. 

December 31, 2014| Programs
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, plaga blandit mara utrum mara comis ne, et lobortis exerci humo nisl praesent brevitas et. Aliquip qui verto pertineo eum jumentum sudo elit luptatum. Plaga consequat augue plaga in velit eu pagus enim euismod incassum esse. Enim loquor autem vero te, in et saepius ventosus typicus. Minim, wisi consectetuer wisi adipiscing nimis dolor epulae defui, adsum defui venio in iaceo.
December 31, 2014| Programs
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, plaga blandit mara utrum mara comis ne, et lobortis exerci humo nisl praesent brevitas et. Aliquip qui verto pertineo eum jumentum sudo elit luptatum. Plaga consequat augue plaga in velit eu pagus enim euismod incassum esse. Enim loquor autem vero te, in et saepius ventosus typicus. Minim, wisi consectetuer wisi adipiscing nimis dolor epulae defui, adsum defui venio in iaceo.
December 31, 2014| Cities

Optimization Modeling

If you’ve ever studied a crowded supermarket shelf—Which brand? Size? Price?—you know the challenge of comparison shopping. So do conservationists. From state governments to local land trusts, cash-strapped conservationists must choose which of America’s special places to save. Today, with tight budgets, those choices are tougher than ever.

But we’ve developed a tool that can help.  Our strategic conservation team, working with a resource economist, has crafted a computer model that enables conservationists to shop smart—by evaluating potential conservation projects for best dollar value.

“We all want the most bang for our buck, and conservation is no different,” says Will Allen, our director of strategic conservation. “Are you spending too much money on expensive projects, or are you getting real value? With public budgets so tight, government officials must be able to justify how they’re spending these dollars wisely.”

The new model “optimizes” conservation decisions. It works by turning raw data about conservation decisions—project costs, benefits (scored numerically), budget constraints—into a user-friendly spreadsheet yielding comparison shopping conclusions.  Using the model, for example, a government agency can quickly compare the relative value of all possible projects and then make, and justify, an informed choice.

Optimization Modeling On The Ground

On the ground, the Baltimore County Agricultural Land Preservation Program in Maryland has already used our optimization model to save 22% more farmland than it would have otherwise over the past three years. Every year since 2007, Baltimore County has applied the optimization model to choose which agricultural lands to save. Optimization has helped the county protect an additional 680 acres of high-quality agricultural land, at a cost savings of roughly $5.4 million—a return on investment over three years of more than 60 to 1. In other words, for every $1 that Baltimore County spent using the optimization model, it has gained more than $60 in conservation benefits.

Wally Lippincott, Land Preservation Administrator in Baltimore County, is pleased with the results: “After trying for years to balance price with farm quality using rank based methods, we switched to optimization. In the first three years of using optimization, Baltimore County has been able to protect an additional 680 acres for the same amount of funds that would otherwise have been spent.  This also translates into a savings of approximately $5.4 million.”

Rob Hirsch likes that the program is easy to use: “Optimization has proven easier to administer and run than our old methods.  During our rank-based days, we performed extra administrative and mathematical work in order to solicit discounts and award extra LESA points for discounting.  With optimization, this is no longer required.”



More about OPTIMIZATION

Purchase book on optimization and strategic conservation
December 31, 2014| Resourceful Communities

 

table of contents

 



Grant Writing for Beginners

Grant Writing for Beginners copy
  • Click here to view all videos from this playlist

New to grant writing and feel overwhelmed by the grant application process? This playlist breaks up the process into manageable pieces and uplifts the most important facets of grant writing for beginners. We recommend you spend time watching all of the videos included here, but feel free to go at your own pace. This playlist includes the following sections:

  • Where to Find Funding
  • Funder Fit
  • Funder Cultivation
  • Grant Writing Checklist
  • Project Description
  • Building a Budget


Download the Grant Writing Checklist here, which is referenced in the Grant Writing Checklist video and is a great tool to reference in the future!




Virtual Peer Learning Visit: McDowell Local Food Action Council
 

Creating Community Food Access

  • Click here to view the video

COVID-19 has upended our world in many ways—but communities have risen to the challenge and proven that necessity truly is the mother of innovation. Learn from McDowell Local Foods Action Council as they share their creative strategies for food access in western NC, and the many ways they continue to adapt to the ever-changing need. This information is useful for all organizations working to increase community food access.




Trails & Greenways Amid COVID-19: Highlighting Hayesville’s Success

Trails and Greenways

  • Click here to view the video

COVID-19 has forced a lot of us indoors, but has also renewed interest in getting outside and enjoying some more isolated outdoor activities. For any organizations who have any interest in building a local trail or using cultural resources as a driver of health and economic development, we present to you the inspiration you need to kick it into gear: the story of Hayesville, NC, as told by Rob Tiger of Clay County Revitalization Association (CCRA)!

This 30-min virtual Peer Learning Visit focuses specifically on the building of Jackrabbit Trail and the partnerships that made it happen. This recording is suitable for any organization that is interested in learning more about the process of getting started with trail-building; it’s full of wisdom from Rob Tiger, who has been part of Hayesville’s renaissance from the start. We hope you are as inspired by their work as we are.




NC Pandemic Reimbursement Webinar

video trainings

  • Click here to view the video

This informational webinar provides details on eligible expenses, acceptable proof of payment documentation, and how to fill out the application. Applications are due December 2, 2020. Reach out to Recourceful Communities if you have additional questions.

Timestamps:

02:30—Overview of reimbursement opportunity

04:45—Documentation of expenses + Q&A on eligible expenses

13:10—Eligibility information

35:00—application run-through & additional Q&A





community garden evaluation

Picture1

  • Click here to view the video

Calling all garden partners! This workshop introduces RCP’s new, one-stop-shopping tool for all your garden evaluation needs. You’ll learn from peers as they share real-life examples of triple-bottom line evaluation for garden-based programming and how they use their data to improve their programs and tell amazing stories.Click here to jump to the evaluation tool.

December 31, 2014| Programs
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, plaga blandit mara utrum mara comis ne, et lobortis exerci humo nisl praesent brevitas et. Aliquip qui verto pertineo eum jumentum sudo elit luptatum. Plaga consequat augue plaga in velit eu pagus enim euismod incassum esse. Enim loquor autem vero te, in et saepius ventosus typicus. Minim, wisi consectetuer wisi adipiscing nimis dolor epulae defui, adsum defui venio in iaceo.
December 31, 2014| Cities
By the Numbers:
Strategic Conservation Planning has performed green infrastructure activities in close to 40 states.

Strategic Conservation Planning has completed greenspace plans for three of the largest metropolitan areas in the country.
The Conservation Fund works across America to support healthy, vibrant cities and more equitable and livable neighborhoods. We start by listening, working with people, local partners, and civic leaders to implement their visions. Our balanced approach to nature and our built environment is helping to revitalize neighborhoods, unite communities, and position cities to thrive for every resident.



December 31, 2014| Cities

Achieving environmental and economic goals often requires solving complex problems. That’s why creating practical approaches that balance natural systems with the built environment is essential for livable communities. Our team thinks big and offers solutions that government leaders, conservationists, and others need to create systemic and lasting environmental solutions in communities across the country. Strategic conservation makes economic sense—establishing an environmental legacy for future generations in the most efficient and cost-effective manner.

We bring strategic conservation expertise to government leaders, industries and communities across the country to achieve the multiple benefits from investing in clean air, clean water, habitat, climate resilience and adaptation, and community livability. We help communities identify their conservation priorities and goals, and we recommend high-impact and cost-effective implementation strategies that help build the capacity of communities to fulfill their conservation visions.

Through state-of-the-art geospatial mapping, and valuing the economic benefit of ecosystem services, we strategically evaluate areas for land protection and stewardship as well as identify opportunities to integrate planning for green and gray infrastructure.

We provide custom tailored tools to help solve complex planning problems:

  • Green infrastructure networks / landscape design
  • Regional conservation visions
  • Ecosystem service valuation
  • Rapid open space assessments
  • Strategic conservation guidance
  • Implementation / acquisition targeting
  • GIS decision support tools and map services
  • Optimization models for cost effective decision making
  • Structured decision tools using the Logic Scoring of Preference method
December 31, 2014| Programs
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, plaga blandit mara utrum mara comis ne, et lobortis exerci humo nisl praesent brevitas et. Aliquip qui verto pertineo eum jumentum sudo elit luptatum. Plaga consequat augue plaga in velit eu pagus enim euismod incassum esse. Enim loquor autem vero te, in et saepius ventosus typicus. Minim, wisi consectetuer wisi adipiscing nimis dolor epulae defui, adsum defui venio in iaceo.
December 31, 2014| Cities
December 31, 2014| Programs
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, plaga blandit mara utrum mara comis ne, et lobortis exerci humo nisl praesent brevitas et. Aliquip qui verto pertineo eum jumentum sudo elit luptatum. Plaga consequat augue plaga in velit eu pagus enim euismod incassum esse. Enim loquor autem vero te, in et saepius ventosus typicus. Minim, wisi consectetuer wisi adipiscing nimis dolor epulae defui, adsum defui venio in iaceo.
December 31, 2014| Cities
December 31, 2014| Programs
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, plaga blandit mara utrum mara comis ne, et lobortis exerci humo nisl praesent brevitas et. Aliquip qui verto pertineo eum jumentum sudo elit luptatum. Plaga consequat augue plaga in velit eu pagus enim euismod incassum esse. Enim loquor autem vero te, in et saepius ventosus typicus. Minim, wisi consectetuer wisi adipiscing nimis dolor epulae defui, adsum defui venio in iaceo.