gc summit logoThe inaugural National Summit for Gateway Communities -- held on December 11-13, 2018, at the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) in Shepherdstown, West Virginia -- celebrated the role of gateway communities in the stewardship of America's public lands and identified opportunities to help them thrive. Presentations and other items from this event can be found on this page. Any questions about how to become involved in this or similar programs should be directed to Katie Allen (304-876-7925 | kallen@conservationfund.org). Suggested edits and additions to the contents of this page can be sent to Margarita Carey (mcarey@conservationfund.org).


Additional Resources:

  • LINK to GroundWorkUSA YouTube playlist (associated with Plenary 4)
April 12, 2017| Cities
Building the capacity of local nonprofits, grassroots organizations, and neighborhood residents is an essential part of our community-centered approach and ensures those that live, work, and play near these Parks with Purpose projects benefit from their development. Engaging with and empowering the community is key in the Fund’s approach to developing these new urban parks.

WHAT IS A PARK with PURPOSE? 

Our Parks with Purpose Initiative pioneers a unique, multi-benefit approach to partnering with communities on innovative greenspaces:

  • We empower communities, as the primary beneficiaries, to set objectives and design park features that ensure a safer and healthier place for families to play and enjoy the outdoors.
  • We embrace equitable, inclusive, and sustainable park development in urban neighborhoods that have been historically denied, disregarded or dismissed.
  • We implement green infrastructure strategies and greenspace design to address chronic problems of stormwater flooding, overflowing sewers, higher urban temperatures and declining air quality.
  • We support economic resiliency through workforce training and employment programs for neighborhood residents.

Our partnership in action:

In each metropolitan area, we are working with local nonprofit partner organizations on community-centered engagement processes so residents can define their specific community interests and needs


Boone-Park-West-rendering.jpgKathryn Johnston Memorial Park, Coming 2019. Credit: Park Design by HGOR


  • Raleigh, NC
    The Fund's lead local partner is Walnut Creek Wetlands Community Partnership, focused on the neighborhoods situated southeast of downtown Raleigh. North Carolina State University's Water Resources Research Institute serves as the Partnership’s fiscal agent and other partners include ILASS and CHER.

  • Washington, DC:
    Together with additional philanthropic partners, we are helping the National Park Service and the National Park Foundation support a new Community Engagement Liaison position to build bridges with residents of historic Anacostia and design a new “friends” organization for Anacostia Park, the key unit of National Capital Parks - East.

    Check out this webinar on equitable development, hosted by The Conservation Fund in partnership with Building Bridges Across the River (BBAR), which features Vaughn Perry, Equitable Development Manager with 11th Street Bridge Park, a project of BBAR, which will be Washington, D.C.’s first elevated public park.

12806004_10207666359955659_3325809588221938564_n.jpgVine City Park (Atlanta, GA)


GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE SOLUTIONS TO OUTDATED INFRASTRUCTURE

These vulnerable communities suffer disproportionately from stormwater flooding, overflowing sewers, higher urban temperatures, and declining air quality.

These persistent problems adversely affect residents’ health and deter investments that could support new businesses and jobs and improve housing, educational opportunities, and public safety.

Our Parks With Purpose projects are investing in new natural green space elements that can hold and filter stormwater, reduce flash flooding and erosion, and expand the capacity of aging, urban sewer systems.


proctorphoto2.jpgOliver Street, the eastern boundary block at Kathryn Johnston Park. Photo credit: Tony Torrence

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

Support is currently needed to underwrite our Workforce Development Programs in each of these urban parks. This community-centered initiative offers job training and employment opportunities to local residents in the fields of ecological restoration, tree care, landscaping, and green infrastructure installation and maintenance.

These new green jobs and valuable employment skills are immediately put to use in each Park With Purpose location for site preparation, renovation and ongoing park preservation, strengthening neighborhood economic resiliency. Learn more about the impact our Parks With Purpose Workforce Development Program has on the lives of young adults in these communities. 


Parks-with-Purpose-1.jpg

Video: Building a Parks With Purpose in Atlanta



April 12, 2017| Cities
Our goal is to grow these opportunities, so that residents, cities, and other nonprofit partners can share successes, challenges, and lessons learned across a wide, collaborative network. Exchanges have included:

  • Delegations from a variety of cities have participated in a learning exchange through the Fund’s partnership with the US Water Alliance and American Rivers to share insights and lessons learned about large scale, integrated watershed management solutions. In addition, the US Water Alliance has engaged six cities—Atlanta, Louisville, Camden, Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Buffalo, and Cleveland are working together on a Water Equity Taskforce aimed at delivering clean and healthy water resources to some of our most vulnerable communities.

Power-of-Peer-1.jpg

  • A partnership of non-profits has established the Atlanta Watershed Learning Network, connecting residents in three of Atlanta’s most imperiled waterways through a green infrastructure advocacy program. The Learning Network has graduated the first class of advocates and a second cohort is currently enrolled in the program. The University of Georgia is currently working with our collaborative partners to develop the curriculum in a web-based platform that can be shared with other watersheds across the country. 

Power-of-Peer-Exchange-2.jpg

  • In 2018, our network of Parks with Purpose teams visited Atlanta for a two-day peer exchange to learn from Atlanta residents and collaborative partners how a community-centered development model was developed, creating new ripples of knowledge and collaborative learning that will expand our partnerships across cities and increase benefits to additional communities. 

Power-of-Peer-Exchange.jpg

  • In 2019, our Parks with Purpose city partners reconvened for a second Peer Exchange in Raleigh. Attendees learned about the importance of community vision planning, communications skills, and about the various community engagement programs in Raleigh and Durham. Our organization proudly supported small local businesses as our vendors to support the local community and economy.

ThePowerOfPeerExchange2018



*Click on the images above to view the Peer Exchange visualization in greater detail. Credit: Mike "Muddy" Schlegel

October 14, 2015| Freshwater Institute

The annual Aquaculture Innovation Workshop (AIW) is dedicated to the discussion and presentation of the latest developments in aquaculture technology. The workshop aims to further the vision of sustainable aquaculture and foster innovation in the field. Over two days, a multitude of speakers present their insights, experimental findings, and general commentary on the industry. If you would like to find out more on past AIW conferences, please feel free to browse through the information below:

  • AIW 1: January 17-18, 2011; Shepherdstown, WV, USA
  • AIW 2: September 26-27, 2011; Campbell River, BC, Canada
  • AIW 3: May 15-16, 2012; Seattle, WA, USA
  • AIW 4: November 5-6, 2012; Comox, BC, Canada
  • AIW 5: September 4-6, 2013; Shepherdstown, WV, USA
  • AIW 6: October 27-28, 2014: Vancouver, BC, Canada
  • AIW 7: October 13-15, 2015; Shepherdstown, WV, USA
  • AIW 8: August 19-21, 2016; Roanoke, VA, USA
  • AIW 9: November 29-30, 2017; Vancouver, BC, Canada
  • AIW 10: December 4-6, 2018; Miami, FL, USA

 



















October 14, 2015| Freshwater Institute

The annual Aquaculture Innovation Workshop (AIW) is dedicated to the presentation of the latest developments in sustainable aquaculture. AIW participants come to discuss sustainable aquaculture seafood production and work to elevate an industry they feel passionately helps improve public health, protects the ocean and natural resources, and is economically viable. Leading representatives from all parts of the aquaculture seafood value chain attend the AIW, including investors, feed suppliers, producers, processors, retailers, chefs, and consumers.

Important message about the 2020 AIW

On behalf of the Aquaculture Innovation Workshop organizing committee, we regret to share with you that the AIW scheduled for April 30-May 1 in New York City is being postponed. Given the current global health concerns around coronavirus (COVID19) and new restrictions being implemented in the US and abroad related to gatherings and recommendations related to social distancing, we feel we must take this step to assure the public’s health and safety.

We anticipate re-scheduling the AIW for later this year. However, due to the uncertainty ahead of us with COVID19, we feel it would be premature to move forward with additional planning at this time.  As soon as we have details for the new dates we will be in contact with you.

Please consider the following as you adjust your plans:

  1. Registration – If you plan to attend the AIW at the later date and would like to keep your registration there is nothing that you need to do. If you would like a refund for your registration please contact our event coordinator, Kata Sharrer at ksharrer@conservationfund.org. Registrations are being refunded in full.
  2. Lodging – If you have made your hotel reservations please contact the hotel and cancel as appropriate. We expect to arrange for a similar room block for the AIW at a later date.
  3. Air travel – Refund policies around COVID19 vary and we encourage you to reach out to your airline to discuss your options.


We want to thank you for your understanding as we re-schedule the AIW for a later date. If you have additional questions, please reach out to us directly in the meantime.


Links

-Five Takeaways from the 2018 Aquaculture Innovation Workshop (blog)
-Click here to view downloadable content (presentations, etc.) from past workshops. 


October 14, 2015| Freshwater Institute

This four-day course on water recirculating aquaculture systems started in 1995 at Cornell University in cooperation with Freshwater Institute staff. The course was held at Cornell University until 1999, after which it was held at the Freshwater Institute as a combined Cornell University/Freshwater Institute course. Course participants were initially university extension associates, however current participants include representatives from commercial fish farms, government fish hatcheries, tribal fish hatcheries, government regulators, universities, research organizations, legislative offices, and fish and wildlife organizations. The combined course continued through 2006, after which the course was taught independently by both institutions until Cornell University stopped offering a classroom course. Current course content covers the fundamentals of water recirculating systems for fish culture including mass balances to maintain water quality, unit process design, and system operation. Course topics include the following:

  • RAS Overview
  • RAS Water Quality
  • Mass Balances
  • Pumping and Piping
  • Circular Tank Design
  • Solids Control & Management
  • Oxygenation
  • Carbon Dioxide control
  • Biofiltration
  • Ozone & UV Processes
  • Fish Health & Biosecurity
  • Monitoring RAS Water Quality
  • RAS Management & Operations
  • RAS Design Examples

Course materials provided to participants include a binder of all presentations and a copy of the book Recirculating Aquaculture 4th edition. The course includes a tour of a RAS facility for hands-on explanation of the engineering and operation. Custom variations of the four-day course (e.g., two-day versions) are available upon request. Custom courses have been provided for a variety of organizations including Marine Harvest Canada, Marine Harvest Norway, Cooke Aquaculture, USFWS, Bonneville Power Administration, California Fish & Wildlife, and Alltech Brazil.

2021 RAS Course

The 2021 RAS Course is tentatively scheduled for Fall 2021. Check back here in Spring 2021 for details on dates and location.

 

2021 COURSE LEADERS 

  • Brian J. Vinci, Ph.D., P.E., Freshwater Institute
  • Christopher M. Good, D.V.M., Ph.D., Freshwater Institute
  • Edward D. Aneshansley, MPS, PE, McMillen Jacobs Associates

2021 Registration

Course registration will include lunch, snacks and coffee each day; lodging will not be included. Registration details and a link to register will be provided once the course dates and location are confirmed. 

If you would like to be placed on a list of people to be notified when the 2021 RAS Course is scheduled and registration goes online, please contact Kata Sharrer (ksharrer@conservationfund.org | 1-304-870-2209).

Cornell Partnership
The Conservation Fund’s Freshwater Institute has partnered with Cornell University’s eCornell to allow participants of Freshwater Institute’s RAS Course to complete Cornell University’s Designing Recirculating Aquaculture Systems online assessment certificate for a reduced cost. Participants who successfully complete the Freshwater Institute’s RAS Course will be eligible to enroll in the online Cornell University Designing Recirculating Aquaculture Systems assessment certificate, which allows participants to take a final exam and gain access to the digital version of the Recirculating Aquaculture 4th edition textbook. Upon successfully passing the final exam, eCornell will issue a Cornell University certificate of completion to the participant. Freshwater Institute’s RAS Course participants can enroll in the assessment evaluation for $75 (a 50% discount on the standard Cornell assessment certificate program of $150).

 

If you are interested in the Freshwater Institute RAS Course but are unable to attend, enrolling in the full Cornell University Designing Recirculating Aquaculture Systems online course is recommended – CLICK HERE for more information and to enroll. A discount on the course is available by emailing cps_support@ecornell.com.

Presentations and resources related to the Fundamentals of Water Quality Markets and Trading


PRESENTATIONS:

Setting Baseline & Who Can Trade:

Managing Risk & Uncertainty:

How do you know credits are real?:

Legal Considerations for Trading: 

Facilitating Water Quality Trading Market Design & Development:

 Improving Water Quality Trading Programs Over Time:


RESOURCES:

  1. BBNA, “EPA Once Again Urged by Alliance To Authorize States to Carry Out Trading” 164 DEN A-10, Aug. 25, 2014 (Copyright 2014 by Bloomberg BNA. Reproduced with permission) (PDF)
  2. Clean Water Act, Section 404 (33 U.S.C. Sec. 1344). (PDF)
  3. Collins and Larry: “Caring for Our Natural Assets: An Ecosystem Services Perspective” USDA, Forest Service, October 2007. (PDF)
  4. Council on Environmental Quality, NEPA regulations, 40 C.F.R. Parts 1500 through 1508. (PDF)
  5. Defense Department, authority to participate in wetland mitigation and conservation banks, 10 U.S.C. Secs. 2694b and 2694c (PDF)
  6. Department of the Interior, “A Strategy for Improving the Mitigation Policies and Practices of The Department of the Interior,” April 2014. (PDF)
  7. Department of the Interior, Secretarial Order No. 3330 “Improving Mitigation Policies and Practices of the Department of the Interior” Oct. 31, 2013. (PDF)
  8. DOT, Federal Highway Administration, Mitigation of Impacts to Wetlands and Natural Habitat regulations, 23 C.F.R. Part 777. (PDF)
  9. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).  Abstracts Related to Water Quality Trading. (PDF)
  10. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).  Case Studies of Water Quality Trading Being Used for Compliance with Nutrient NPDES Permit Limits, December 2013. (LINK) (PDF)
  11. Endangered Species Act, 
    a. Sec. 7 (16 U.S.C. Sec. 1536) (PDF)
    b. Sec. 10 (16 U.S.C. Sec. 1539) (PDF)
  12. Environmental Law Institute. 2005 Status Report on Compensatory Mitigation in the United States. Washington, DC, 2006. (PDF)
  13. EPA Compensatory Mitigation for Losses of Aquatic Resources, 40 C.F.R. Part 230, Subpart J. (PDF)
  14. EPA Sulfur Dioxide Allowance System, 40 C.F.R. 73. (PDF)
  15. Executive Order 13563—Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review, Jan. 18, 2011. (PDF)
  16. Executive Order 13604—Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects, March 28, 2012. (PDF)
  17. Executive Order 13186. Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds, signed Jan. 10, 2001 (Sec. 3(e)(2) restore and enhance the habitat of migratory birds, as practicable). (PDF)
  18. Federal Land Policy and Management Act (43 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.) (PDF)
  19. The Freshwater Trust. BasinScout: Watershed Restoration Methodology, Info Sheet. (PDF)
  20. The Freshwater Trust. Water Quality Trading: Program Overview, Info Sheet. (PDF)
  21. Forest Trends, Ecosystem Marketplace Initiative. Gaining Depth: State of Watershed Investment 2014 Report:   (LINK) (PDF)
  22. Forest Trends, The Katoomba Group and UNEP.  “Payments for Ecosystem Services: Getting Started – A Primer.” 2008 (PDF)
  23. Kiesecker, Joseph M, et. al. “Development by Design: blending landscape-level planning with the mitigation hierarchy.” Front. Ecol. Environ. Doi: 10.1890/090005, 2009. (PDF)
  24. Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board and Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. “Lake Clarity Crediting Program Handbook: For Lake Tahoe TMDL Implementation”, August 2015. (PDF)
  25. Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board and Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. “Lake Tahoe TMDL Program Management System Handbook: Guiding Efforts to Restore Lake Tahoe’s Historic Clarity”, December 2014. (PDF)
  26. LaRocco, Gina L.; Deal, Robert L. “Giving credit where credit is due: increasing landowner compensation for ecosystem services” USDA, Forest Service, 2011. (PDF)
  27. Madsen, Becca et al. “Update: State of Biodiversity Markets.” Washington, DC. Forest Trends. 2011. (PDF)
  28. Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act - As amended 2007. (PDF)
  29. Maillett and Simon: “Characteristics of Existing Federal Conservation Banks” USFWS Discussion Paper, September 2007. (PDF)
  30. Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, as amended (16 U.S. C. 1361). (PDF)
  31. McKenney, Bruce and Joseph M. Kiesecker, “Policy Development for Biodiversity Offsets: a Review of Offset Frameworks,” Environmental Management 45:165, 2010. (PDF)
  32. National Association of Conservation Districts, “Markets, Trading and Credits: New Opportunities for Conservation Districts” Spring 2009. (PDF)
  33. National Environmental Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.) (PDF)
  34. National Marine Fisheries Service regulations, 50 C.F.R. Parts 222. (PDF)
  35. The National Network on Water Quality Trading. Building a Water Quality Trading Program: Options and Considerations, 2015.  (LINK) (PDF)
  36. The National Network on Water Quality Trading. Building a Water Quality Trading Program: Options and Considerations, 2015, Executive Summary.  (LINK) (PDF)
  37. The National Network on Water Quality Trading. Building a Water Quality Trading Program: Options and Considerations – Sector Summaries:
    a. Agriculture Community Focus Summary by American Farmland Trust (PDF)
    b. Environmental Community Focus Summary by Environmental Law and Policy Center (PDF)
    c. State Perspectives by the Association of Clean Water Administrators (PDF)
    d. NACWA Perspectives on Water Quality Trading (PDF)
    e. Trading Practitioner Focus Summary by Troutman Sanders (PDF)
  38. The National Network on Water Quality Trading, National Network Overview, June 10, 2015. (PDF)
  39. NOAA Catch Share Policy, 2010. (PDF)
  40. NRCS & USFWS, “Partnership Agreement Between the US Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and the US Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service and Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies”, April 2007. (PDF)
  41. Presidential Memorandum—Modernizing Federal Infrastructure Review and Permitting Regulations, Policies and Procedures, May 17, 2013. (PDF)
  42. Presidential Memorandum—Transforming Our Nation’s Electric Grid Through Improved Siting, Permitting and Review, June 7, 2013. (PDF)
  43. Section 314(b) of the 2004 National Defense Authorization Act (Pub. L. 108–136) [authorizing USACE regulations for onsite, offsite and in-lieu fee mitigation] (PDF)
  44. U.S. EPA.  Water Quality Trading Assessment Handbook:  Can Water Quality Trading Advance Your Watershed’s Goals?, EPA 841-B-04-001,  November 2004.   (LINK) (PDF)
  45. U.S. EPA.  Water Quality Trading Policy, Office of Water, January 13, 2003. (PDF)
  46. U.S. EPA.  Water Quality Trading Program Fact Sheets, Appendices to Water Quality Trading Toolkit for Permit Writers, EPA 833-R-07-004, Published August 2007, Updated June 2009. (PDF)
  47. U.S. EPA.  Water Quality Trading Toolkit for Permit Writers, EPA 833-R-07-004, Published August 2007, Updated June 2009. (PDF)
  48. EPA & USDA, “Partnership Agreement Between the US Department of Agriculture and the US Environmental Protection Agency Regarding Water Quality Trading”, November 2013. (PDF)
  49. Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act (16 U.S.C. 661 et seq.) (PDF)
  50. USFWS “Conservation Banking: Incentives for Stewardship” July 2009 (PDF)
  51. USFWS “Guidance for Establishment, Use, and Operation of Conservation Banks” issued May 8, 2003, 68 Fed. Reg. 24753. (PDF)
  52. USFWS, “Mitigation Policy,” 46 Fed. Reg. 7643, Jan. 23, 1981 [in process of being updated]. (PDF)
  53. USFWS. Programmatic Formal Consultation for US Army Corps of Engineers 404 Permitted Projects that May Affect Four Endangered Plant Species on the Santa Rosa Plain, California. 1998 (PDF)
  54. USFWS. Programmatic Formal Consultation on Issuance of 404 Permits for Projects with Relatively Small Effects on Listed Vernal Pool Crustaceans Within the Jurisdiction of the Sacramento Field Office, California. 1996. (PDF)
  55. USFWS, Strategic Habitat Conservation: Landscape Conservation Cooperatives Fact Sheet, July 2012. (PDF)
  56. USACE.  Model “Operational Guidelines for Creating or Restoring Wetlands that are Ecologically Self-Sustaining” for Aquatic Resource Impacts Under the corps Regulatory Program Pursuant to Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and Section 10 of the Rivers and Harbors Act. Memorandum to the Field. Oct. 29, 2003. (PDF)
  57. USACE “National Wetland Mitigation Banking Study: Technical and Procedural Support to Mitigation Banking Guidance” IWR Technical Paper WMB-TP-2, December 1995. (PDF)
  58. USACE Wetland Compensatory Mitigation Regulations, 33 C.F.R. Part 332. (PDF)
  59. USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service, “Natural Resources Credit Trading Reference,” October 2011. (PDF)
  60. Woodward, Richard T. and Ronald A. Kaiser. Market Structures for U.S. Water Quality Trading. Review of Agricultural Economics 24(2): 366-383, 2011.  (LINK) (PDF)
  61. Working Lands Investment Partners LLC, “Environmental Credit Markets: An Investment Primer” October 2009. (PDF)
  62. World Resources Institute, “Current and Potential Roles for Government in Facilitating Water Quality Markets”. (PDF)
  63. World Resources Institute, “How Can Conservation Programs Effectively Interact with Environmental Markets?” (PDF)

Web Resources:
Further Reading:

Regional Outlook presentations and resources related to Water Quality Markets


CHESAPEAKE BAY REGION:

PRESENTATIONS:


RESOURCES:

  1. BBNA, “Maryland Close to Launching ‘Gold Standard' Nutrient Trading Program, State Official Says,” 182 DEN A-10, Sept. 19, 2014 (Copyright 2014 by Bloomberg BNA. Reproduced with permission.) (PDF)
  2. Branosky, Evan, Cy Jones, and Mindy Selman. “Comparison Tables of State Nutrient Trading Programs in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed” World Resources Institute, May 2011. (PDF)
  3. Chesapeake Bay Commission. “Nutrient Credit Trading for the Chesapeake Bay: An Economic Study.” May 2012. (PDF)
  4. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement”. 2014. (PDF)
  5. Code of Virginia. Chesapeake Bay Watershed Nutrient Credit Exchange Program, Title 62.1. Waters of the State, Ports and Harbors, Chapter 3.1. State Water Control Law, Article 4.02. (PDF)
  6. Code of Virginia. Nutrient credit use and additional offsite options for construction activities, Title 62.1. Waters of the State, Ports and Harbors, Chapter 3.1. State Water Control Law, § 62.1-44.15:35. (PDF)
  7. Ecosystem Services Working Group, “Ecosystem Services Working Group Final Report”. October 2011. (PDF)
  8. Executive Order 13508—Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration, May 12, 2009. (PDF)
  9. Local Government Advisory Committee and Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay. “Our Waters, Our Towns: Local Governments’ Role in the Watershed Implementation Plans.” 2011. (PDF)
  10. National Water Quality Trading Alliance, Memo on the Draft Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement, March 17, 2014. (PDF)
  11. Nobles, Alicia L., Hillary D. Goldstein, Jonathan L. Goodall, G. Mitchell Fitch. Virginia Center for Transportation Innovation & Research. Investigating the Cost-Effectiveness of Nutrient Credit Use As an Option for VDOT Stormwater Permitting Requirements, VCTIR 15-R9, August 2014.   (LINK)(PDF)
  12. Ribaudo, Marc, Jeffrey Savage, and Marcel Aillery, “An Economic Assessment of Policy Options to Reduce Agricultural Pollutants in the Chesapeake Bay” USDA, Economic Research Service Report No. 166, June 2014. (PDF)
  13. Sample Nutrient Credit Assignment Agreement. (PDF)
  14. Slater, James E., Jr. and Glenn D. Edwards. Case Study: Effective Forest Banking: Forest Conservation in Carroll County, Maryland, from A Sustainable Chesapeake: Better Models for Conservation, The Conservation Fund. (PDF)
  15. Virginia Department of Transportation. The Purchase of Nutrient Credits to address Post-Construction Water Quality Reduction Requirements for Construction Activities, Instructional and Informational Memo, OT IIM-LD-251.2, January 2015. (PDF)
  16. World Resources Institute.  Comparison and Effectiveness of Chesapeake Bay Nutrient Trading Program Policies, USDA Office of Environmental Markets, 2014. (PDF)

Web Resources:


GREAT LAKES REGION:

PRESENTATIONS:


RESOURCES:

  1. Fox P Trade. Project Overview and Application Packet Fact Sheets, Adapting and Applying Water Quality Tracking in the Lower Fox Watershed, August 2015. (PDF)
  2. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.  A Water Quality Trading How To Manual:  Guidance on developing a water quality trading strategy based on protocols specified in “Guidance for Implementing Water Quality Trading in WPDES Permits”, Guidance Number: 3400-2013-03, 2013.   (LINK) (PDF)
  3. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.  Guidance for Implementing Water Quality Trading in WPDES Permits, Guidance Number: 3800-2013-04, 2013   (LINK) (PDF)
  4. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.  Water Quality Trading Factsheet, 2013.  (LINK) (PDF)


Web Resources:


MISSISSIPPI RIVER AND GULF COAST REGION:

PRESENTATIONS:


RESOURCES:

  1. Perez, Michelle, Sara Walker, and Cy Jones.  Nutrient Trading in the MRB:  A Feasibility Study for Using Large-Scale Interstate Nutrient Trading in the Mississippi River Basin to Help Address Hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico, World Resources Institute,  March 2013. (PDF)
  2. Ren, W., H. Tian, B. Tao, J. Yang, S. Pan, W.-J. Cai, S. E. Lohrenz, R. He, and C. S. Hopkinson, Large increase in dissolved inorganic carbon flux from the Mississippi River to Gulf of Mexico due to climatic and anthropogenic changes over the 21st century, J. Geophys. Res. Biogeosci., 120, 724–736, doi:10.1002/2014JG002761, 2015.  (PDF)
  3. Tao, B., H. Tian, W. Ren, J. Yang, Q. Yang, R. He, W. Cai, and S. Lohrenz, Increasing Mississippi river discharge throughout the 21st century influenced by changes in climate, land use, and atmospheric CO2, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 4978–4986, doi:10.1002/2014GL060361, 2014. (PDF)
  4. Tian, H. et al., Climate extremes dominating seasonal and interannual variations in carbon export from the Mississippi River Basin, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 29, doi:10.1002/ 2014GB005068, 2015. (PDF)
  5. Wabash River Watershed Water Quality Trading Feasibility Study - Final Report. 2011. Prepared by the Conservation Technology Information Center for USEPA Targeted Watershed Grant WS-00E71501-0. (LINK)(PDF)


Web Resources:


Further Reading:

  • Burton C. English.  A Spatial Assessment of Possible Water Quality Trading Markets in Tennessee. Review of Agricultural Economics-Volume 30, Number 4, pp. 711-728.

PACIFIC NORTHWEST AND CALIFORNIA REGION:

PRESENTATIONS:


RESOURCES:

  1. Clean Water Services. The Tualatin River Watershed:  Balancing People, Nature, and Water, Info Sheet. (PDF)
  2. Envirotech Publications, Inc. The Water Report, May 15, 2014. Water Quality & Temperature Trading in the Tualatin Basin.  Laura Porter, Bruce Roll, Raj Kapur, and Anil Devnani, Clean Water Services (Hillsboro, Oregon)] (PDF)
  3. The Freshwater Trust. Rogue River Basin Riparian Restoration Program, Info Sheet.  (PDF)
  4. Tree for All. Info Sheet. (PDF)
  5. Willamette Partnership and The Freshwater Trust. Draft Regional Recommendations for the Pacific Northwest on Water Quality Trading, Multi-State Agency Guidance for Water Quality Trading: Joint Regional Water Quality Trading Agreement (69-3A75-12-255) August 2014, Third Draft. (PDF)


Web Resources:

Economics presentations and resources related to Water Quality Markets


PRESENTATIONS:


Credit Pricing & Accounting

Uncertainty & Thin Markets

Addressing Risk & Liability

Program Cost & Social Conditions

Linkages to Other Markets & Stacking

RESOURCES:

  1. Business for Social Responsibility (BSR). “The Quiet Revolution in Expectations of Corporate Environmental Performance: Emerging Trends in the Uptake of Ecosystem Services.” April 2012. (PDF)
  2. Chan, Kai, Lara Hoshizaki, Brian Klinkenberg. “Ecosystem Services in Conservation Planning: Targeted Benefits vs. Co-Benefits or Costs?” PLoS ONE: Sept 2011. (PDF)
  3. Christianson, Laura, John Tyndall, Matthew Helmers.  Financial Comparison of Seven Nitrate Reduction Strategies for Midwestern Agricultural Drainage, Water Resources and Economics, 2-3, 2013, pp. 30–56. (PDF)
  4. Climate Action Reserve, “Nutrient Management Project Protocol Credit Stacking Subcommittee Meeting #1 Memo” July 12, 2011. (PDF)
  5. Cooley, David and Lydia Olander. Stacking Ecosystem Services Payments: Risks and Solutions, Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions Working Paper, NI WP 11-04, September 2011. (PDF)
  6. Doyle, Martin W. et al, “Optimizing the Scale of Markets for Water Quality Trading” September 2014. (PDF)
  7. EcoAgricultural Partners and USDA Office of Environmental Markets. Farm of the Future Case Study Series: April 2011: a. “Big River and Salmon Creek Forests (Northern California)” (PDF) b. “Buck Island Ranch (Northern Everglades, Florida)” (PDF) c. “Mudford Farm (Chesapeake Bay, Maryland)” (PDF) d. EcoAgricultural Partners and USDA Office of Environmental Markets. “Sacramento River Ranch (Yolo County, California)” (PDF) e. “The Watson Partners Farm (Minnesota River Basin and the Southern Minnesota Beet Sugar Cooperative)” (PDF)
  8. Ertimur, Yonca, Jennifer Francis, Amanda Gonzales, and Katherine Schipper.  Financial Reporting for Cap-and-Trade Emissions Reduction Programs, Duke University, December 2009. (PDF)
  9. Faeth, Paul. “Fertile Ground: Nutrient Trading's Potential to Cost-Effectively Improve Water Quality” World Resources Institute, May 2000. (PDF)
  10. Fox, Jessica, Royal C. Gardner, and Todd Maki. “Stacking Opportunities and Risks in Environmental Markets” Environmental Law Reporter, 41 ELR 10121, February 2011. (PDF)
  11. Gardner, Royal C. and Jessica Fox.  "The Legal Status of Environmental Credit Stacking", 40 Ecology L.Q., 2013. (LINK)(PDF)
  12. Hartwell, Ray, Bruce Aylward, Sue Lurie, Sally Duncan, Katrina Van Dis, “Ecosystem Service Market Development: The Role and Opportunity for Finance” March 2010. (PDF)
  13. Hook, Patrick W. and Spencer T. Shadle, “Navigating Wetland Mitigation Markets: A Study of Risks Facing Entrepreneurs and Regulators.” December 2013. (PDF)
  14. Layne, Valerie, “Layering Multiple Credit Types in Mitigation Banks” National Wetlands Newsletter, Vol. 33, Issue 1, 2011. (*starts on p. 8) (PDF)
  15. Murray, B. and T. Vegh.  Incentivizing the Reduction of Pollution at Dairies: How to Address Additionality When Multiple Environmental Credit Payments Are Combined, NI WP 15-01. Durham, NC: Duke University, 2015. (LINK)(PDF)
  16. Niemi, E., Lee, K., Raterman, T. “Net economic benefits of using ecosystem restoration to meet stream temperature requirements.” ECONorthwest. (PDF)
  17. Rees, Gwendolen and Dr. Kurt Stephenson. Transaction costs of nonpoint source water quality credits: Implications for trading programs in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, USDA, Office of Environmental Markets, November 2014. (PDF)
  18. Ribaudo, Marc, LeRoy Hansen, Daniel Hellerstein, and Catherine Greene, “The Use of Markets to Increase Private Investment in Environmental Stewardship” USDA, Economic Research Service Report No. 64, September 2008. (PDF)
  19. Robertson, Morgan, Todd K BenDor, Rebecca Lave, Adam Riggsbee, JB Ruhl, and Martin Doyle.  "Stacking Ecosystem Services", Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 2014; doi:10.1890/110292. (PDF)
  20. Scarlett, Lynn and James Boyd, “Ecosystem Services: Quantification, Policy Applications, and Current Federal Capabilities” Resources for the Future, March 2011. (PDF)
  21. Shortle, James, David Abler, Zach Kaufman, Kate Zip.  Implications of Lags in Pollution Delivery for Efficient Agricultural Waste Load Allocations and the Design of Water Quality Trading Programs, Washington, DC: USDA, 2014. (PDF)
  22. Smith, M., de Groot, D., Perrot-Maîte, D. and Bergkamp, G. (2006). “Pay – Establishing payments for watershed services.” IUCN, 2008. (PDF)
  23. Suter, J.F., Spraggon, J.M. and G.L. Poe, Water Quality Trading Experiments: Thin Markets and Lumpy Capital investments, GWF Discussion Paper 1328, Global Water Forum, Canberra, Australia, 2013. (LINK)(PDF)
  24. Suter, J.F., Spraggon, J.M. and G.L. Poe. Thin and Lumpy: An Experimental Investigation of Water Quality Trading, Paper presented at the Agricultural & Applied Economics Associations 2011 AAEA & NAREA Joint Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, July 24- 26, 2011. (LINK)(PDF)
  25. Tiedemann, Rob, Ph.D., Hal Anderson, Integrated Watershed Solutions, Inc. North Alkali Drain Water Quality Improvement Pilot Project, Project Summary and Report of Preliminary Results, Prepared for Members of the Board of Directors, Lower Boise Watershed Council, Inc. January 6, 2015 (PDF)
  26. Walker, Sara and Mindy Selman, “Addressing Risk and Uncertainty in Water Quality Trading Markets”. World Resources Institute, February 2014. (PDF)
  27. White, Wayne and Jemma Penelope, “Stacking and Unstacking: The Economics, the Conservation, and the Conversation,” National Wetlands Newsletter, Vol. 35, Issue 2, 2013. (PDF)

Web Resources:


Further Reading:

  • Adoption Potential of Nitrate Mitigation Practices: An Ecosystem Services Approach.  International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability, 2013.  DOI: 10.1080/14735903.2013.835604

Tools and Technology presentations and resources related to Water Quality Markets


PRESENTATIONS:


Conservation Practice Evaluation

EnviroAtlas

Information Resources & Training

Tools for Trading


RESOURCES:

  1. Boyd, James and Lisa Wainger, “Measuring Ecosystem Service Benefits: The Use of Landscape Analysis to Evaluate Environmental Trades and Compensation,” Resources for the Future, April 2003. (PDF)
  2. Environmental Incentives. “Road RAM User Manual, V2: Road Rapid Assessment Methodology”, Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, May 2015. (PDF)
  3. Geospatial Platform. “Federal Geographic Data Committee Launches New Geospatial Website” [Press Release]. (PDF)
  4. Great Lakes Commission. Point To Nonpoint Water Quality Trading Checklist Template (LINK)(PDF)
  5. Kieser and Associates.  A Scientifically Defensible Process for the Exchange of Pollutant Credits under Minnesota’s Proposed Water Quality Trading Rules.  Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. June 2009. (PDF)
  6. NEPAssist Fact Sheet (PDF)
  7. RIBITS: Credit Classifications (PDF)
  8. RIBITS: Finding Credits (PDF)
  9. RIBITS: Getting Started with RIBITS (PDF)
  10. RIBITS: Understanding the RIBITS Credit Ledger (PDF)
  11. RIBITS: Utilizing RIBITS Reporting Tools (PDF)
  12. Richardson et al. “Integrated stream and wetland restoration: a watershed approach to improved water quality on the landscape.” Ecol. Engineering 37: 25-39. 2011. (PDF)

Web Resources:


Further Reading:

Stormwater presentations and resources related to Water Quality Markets


PRESENTATIONS:


RESOURCES:

  1. American Rivers. “Funding Green Infrastructure in Pennsylvania: Funding the Future of Stormwater Management.” (PDF)
  2. American Rivers. “Weathering Change: Policy Reforms that Save Money and Make Communities Safer.” (PDF)
  3. Arrandale, Tom. “The Price of Greening Stormwater.” Governing. April 2012. (PDF)
  4. Branosky, Evan.  From Gray to Green:  Stormwater Trading in Washington D.C. District Department of the Environment, River Network, River Voices, pp. 7-8, 2015. (PDF)
  5. District Department of the Environment, Stormwater Retention, Credit Trading & RiverSmart Rewards (brochure), 2014. (PDF)
  6. EPRI. Butler County Board of Commissioners, from Case Studies of Water Quality Trading Being Used for Compliance with National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit Limits, EPRI, 2013, Section 3. (PDF)
  7. Fowler, Lara B., Matthew B. Royer, and Jamison E. Colburn. Addressing Death by a Thousand Cuts: Legal and Policy Innovations to Address Nonpoint Source Runoff, Choices Magazine,  3rd Quarter 2013.  (LINK) (PDF)
  8. The GreenSeams Program. “Preserve Guide 2001-2010 Ten Years in Review.” (PDF)
  9. Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD). “Fresh Coast Green Solutions: Weaving Milwaukee’s Green and Grey Infrastructure into a Sustainable Future.” (PDF)
  10. PLANYC and NYC Environmental Protection. “New York City Green Infrastructure Plan: A Sustainable Strategy for Clean Waterways.” (PDF)
  11. Plevan, Andrea, Megan Burke, Jared Oswald, James Klang, and Joanna Allerhand.  Pollutant Suitability Evaluation for a Water Quality Credit Trading Program in the Central Big Sioux Watershed, Moody County Conservation District. Topical Report RSI-2388, October 2013. (PDF)
  12. Seters, Tim Van, Christy Graham, Lisa Rocha (Toronto and Region Conservation) and Mariko Uda, Chris Kennedy (University of Toronto, Department of Civil Engineering). Assessment of Life Cycle Costs for Low Impact Development Stormwater Management Practices: Final Report, 2013.  (LINK) (PDF)
  13. Talberth, John, Erin Gray, Evan Branosky and Todd Gartner. “Insights from the Field: Forests for Water.” World Resources Institute Issue Brief 9: Feb 2012. (PDF)
  14. US Environmental Protection Agency.  Integrated Municipal Stormwater and Wastewater Planning Approach Framework, Memorandum, May 2012.  (LINK) (PDF)
  15. Valderrama, Alisa and Larry Levine. Financing Stormwater Retrofits in Philadelphia and Beyond. Natural Resources Defense Council, February 2012.  (LINK) (PDF)
  16. Valderrama, Alisa, Lawrence Levine, Eron Bloomgarden, Ricardo Bayon, Kelly Wachowicz, Charlotte Kaiser. Issue Brief - Creating Clean Water Cash Flows: Developing Private Markets for Green Stormwater Infrastructure in Philadelphia. NRDC, EKO Asset Management Partners, The Nature Conservancy. Funded by a grant from: Rockefeller Foundation, February 2013. (LINK)  (PDF)
  17. Wainger, Lisa A. and James S. Shortle, Local Innovations in Water Protection: Experiments with Economic Incentives, Choices Magazine,  3rd Quarter 2013. (LINK)  (PDF)
  18. Willamette Partnership, Pinchot Institute for Conservation, and World Resources Institute, In It Together: A How-To Reference for Building Point-Nonpoint Water Quality Trading Programs - PART I, 2012. (LINK)  (PDF)

Web Resources:

Water Quantity presentations and resources related to Water Quality Markets

 

PRESENTATIONS:


RESOURCES:

  1. Amundsen, Ole M., Will Allen, and Kris Hoellen.  Green Infrastructure Planning:  Recent Advances and Applications, PAS Memo, May/June 2009.  (LINK) (PDF)
  2. Buranen, Margaret.  Milwaukee Goes Green and Grey for Stormwater Management, Stormwater Journal, May 2012. (LINK) (PDF)
  3. Hrobar, Jessica. Innovative Program Connects Wastewater Utilities and Nature, Water World, v. 4, Issue 4, (undated).  (LINK) (PDF)
  4. Leonard Rice Engineers, Inc.  Holistic Approach to Sustainable Water Management in Northwest Douglas County, Colorado Water Conservation Board, January 2007.  (LINK) (PDF)
  5. Mammoth Trading, “About Us”. (LINK) (PDF)
  6. NOAA. Resilient Land and Waters Initiative, Tranche 1, April 21, 2015.  (LINK) (PDF)
  7. Oregon State University.  Oregon’s Water Markets, Institute For Water And Watersheds And Institute For Natural Resources, April, 2012 (LINK) (PDF)


Web Resources:



Water Quality Markets: Resources


In 2015 the USDA and EPA cosponsored the National Workshop on Water Quality Markets. This event was hosted by the Robert B. Daugherty Water for Food Institute at the University of Nebraska and coordinated by The Conservation Fund. The Workshop highlighted recent progress in water quality trading across the country with an emphasis on policy, resources, and tool development. The compendium of resources associated with this program - organized by theme - is available below.


Trading Fundamentals VIEW

Resources on core elements and major aspects of water quality markets and trading programs
 

Regional Outlook VIEW

Resources on existing water quality trading activities across the United States, highlighting the below regions:
  • Chesapeake Bay Region
  • Great Lakes Region
  • Mississippi River Basin and Gulf Coast Region
  • Pacific Northwest & California Region


Economics VIEW

Resources on analysis and insights into water quality markets, economic trends, and supply and demand as well as on other water market types, including watershed services, water rights, and links to species and habitat markets

Tools and Technology VIEW

Resources on tools, underlying science, and emerging technologies employed by various programs as well as opportunities and challenges for broader use in the field of water quality

Stormwater VIEW

Resources on a cross-section of existing and emerging stormwater trading programs, examine regulatory drivers for stormwater offsets, and explore different stormwater trading program designs

Water Quantity VIEW

Resources on legal, economic, business, and regulatory aspects of water quantity trading for managing ecological and transboundary stream flow impacts in complex regulatory regimes

 

More Information:

Please contact Chris Hartley, USDA Office of Environmental Markets (chartley@oce.usda.gov | 202-690-0832 ) OR Katie Allen, The Conservation Fund's Conservation Leadership Network (kallen@conservationfund.org | 304-876-7925) with any questions or to suggest additional resources.


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In partnership with the US Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the US Fish & Wildlife Service, The Conservation Fund's Conservation Leadership Network (CLN) offers an annual training course for members of Interagency Review Teams (IRTs) on Mitigation Banking & In-Lieu Fee Programs. The course is designed to increase the effectiveness of IRTs in reviewing proposed 3rd party mitigation and overseeing their operation. 

Resources and presentations from the June 2019 course offering -- organized by session -- are available for download below. Also available for download are the Course Agenda (pdf) and Resource List (pdf). For information about this and other CLN course offerings, see the Upcoming Courses & Events page.

  • Session 1: Overview Materials (zip file)
  • Session 2: IRTs/MBI Documentation Materials (zip file)
  • Session 3: Site Selection Materials (zip file)
  • Session 4: Site Protection Materials (zip file)
  • Session 5: Business of Banking Materials (zip file)
  • Session 6: Service Area Materials (zip file)
  • Session 7: In-Lieu Fee Materials (zip files) Part 1 |  Part 2 | Part 3
  • Session 8: Short-Term Financial Assurance Materials (zip file)
  • Session 9a: Wetland Crediting Materials (zip files) Part 1 | Part 2
  • Session 9b: Stream Crediting Materials (zip files) Part 1 | Part 2
  • Session 10: Performance Standards/Credit Release Materials (zip file)
  • Session 11: Conservation Banking/Joint Banking Materials (zip file)
  • Session 12: Long-Term Management/Stewardship Financing Materials (zip file)
  • Session 13: Oversight & Compliance Materials (zip file)
  • Session 14: Dispute Resolution Materials (zip file)
  • RIBITS Session Materials (zip file)
  • Class Exercise Materials (zip file)

This 8-part webinar series being offered from October 2020 – January 2021 is designed to provide an introduction to foundational topics related to conservation banking for endangered species and habitat recovery, as well as joint authority programs that mitigate for impacts to wetlands and streams.

In addition to addressing core elements of conservation and joint authority banking establishment and implementation, this series also covers in-lieu fee programs and other alternative mitigation programs. Field experts from federal regulatory agencies, non-governmental organizations, and the private banking community will be presenting each webinar.

Conservation banking is a tool to conserve endangered, threatened, and other at-risk species and their habitat that reduces risks associated with and increases the success of compensatory mitigation. Other benefits include:

  • Regulatory efficiencies for agencies, industry, project proponents, bank sponsors, and credit buyers
  • Increased transparency and predictability through advance planning at a landscape level
  • Greater economic incentives for conserving species that result in effective and sustainable conservation outcomes


WHO SHOULD ATTEND & HOW TO REGISTER

This series is intended for anyone interested in learning more about conservation and joint authority mitigation banking. This webinar series is offered at no cost to participants. Registration is by individual webinar; click on the “REGISTER NOW” button associated with each webinar below. We encourage people to attend all webinars to gain a comprehensive understanding of conservation banking and how all the topics relate to each other.

To participate, you must have access to the WebEx webinar platform, high-speed internet, and the ability to connect to audio via your computer or telephone. Closed-captioning will be available for each session.


SERIES SCHEDULE

 

WEBINAR #1: The Market & Regulatory Drivers for Conservation Banking

Presented live on October 14, 2020, this webinar provides an overview of environmental markets and the drivers for Conservation Banking as a market-based tool. Presenters outline what conservation and joint banking is within the regulatory context, summarize the required documentation for conservation banking enabling instruments, and provide an overview of conservation banking practices – past, present, and future – across the United States. 

VIEW MATERIALS



WEBINAR #2: Banking Perspectives: The Business of Buying & Selling Credits

Presented live on October 21, 2020, this webinar provides an overview of the business of compensatory mitigation banking with insight into the risks that factor into the decision to sponsor a bank. Complementary to the presentation on the business of banking is a panel of private bankers and representatives from of credit buying agencies and organizations for a round-table discussion on current issues, emerging trends in credit supply and demand, and overcoming barriers to entering a market or using banking as tool.

 


 

WEBINAR #3: Setting the Stage for Success: Strategic Site Selection & Durable Site Protection Mechanisms

Presented live on November 5, 2020, this session provides an overview of regulatory guidance for selecting mitigation sites and the best practices used by bankers to select suitable sites for meeting mitigation requirements. The session also reviews the suite of site protection mechanisms needed to minimize risk and create durable and successful mitigation banks.

VIEW Materials



 

WEBINAR #4: Operation & Management of Banks: The Role of Mitigation Review Teams & Banking Partners

Wednesday, December 2, 2020
2:00 – 4:00 PM Eastern / 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Pacific


This session will provide an overview of the roles and responsibilities of the mitigation review team (MRT) and other banking partners during the instrument development, implementation, and management phases of a bank. Best practices will be shared in how active operations and management can minimize risk and increase the success of banks in meeting all mitigation compliance requirements.



WEBINAR #5: Service Area & Credit Determination: Balancing Ecological & Economic Factors

Tuesday, December 8, 2020
2:00 – 4:00 PM Eastern / 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Pacific


This session will be a nuts and bolts review of how the type and number of credits are determined for a bank and how the extent of the service area is determined. For each topic, case studies ranging from the straight-forward to the complicated will be shared, along with lessons-learned and emerging trends from the field. Striking the balance between ecological and economic needs will be discussed from diverse perspectives.

It is recommended that participants attend (or watch the recording of Webinar 1: The Market & Regulatory Drivers for Conservation Banking prior to attending this webinar. Live-captioning is available during the webinar at no cost to participants; to access please go to: https://www.captionedtext.com/client/event.aspx?EventID=4609190&CustomerID=321

Presenters:

Scott Chiavacci, US Geological Survey
Greg DeYoung, Westervelt Ecological Services
Stephanie Ehinger, NOAA National Marine Fisheries
Dana Herman, US Fish & Wildlife Service
Deblyn Mead, Bureau of Land Management
Michelle Mattson, US Army Corps of Engineers Institute for Water Resources



WEBINAR #6:  Long-Term Management & Stewardship: Roles & Requirements for the Bank After it Closes

Wednesday, January 13, 2021
2:00 – 4:00 PM Eastern / 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Pacific


This session will discuss the roles and responsibilities of bank sponsors and long-term stewards in developing and implementing management plans and the stewardship funding mechanism(s) needed to ensure continued mitigation compliance. Topics will include cost analysis of long-term management practices, adaptive management, and key needs of the third-party land steward to adequately fund management activities in perpetuity.

It is recommended that participants attend or watch the recording of Webinar 1: The Market & Regulatory Drivers for Conservation Banking prior to attending this webinar. Live-captioning is available during the webinar at no cost to participants; to access please go to: https://www.captionedtext.com/client/event.aspx?EventID=4609193&CustomerID=321

Presenters:

Matt Gause, Westervelt Ecological Services
Clint Miller, The Conservation Fund



WEBINAR #7: Alternatives to Banking (Part I) – Programmatic Approaches

Wednesday, January 20, 2021
2:00 – 4:00 PM Eastern / 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Pacific


The first of a two-part series on alternative compensatory mitigation tools, this webinar will include an in-depth look at programmatic approaches such as In-Lieu Fee (ILF) programs and how they are different than banks and when to use them. The session will look at examples from across the country and discuss key lessons learned.

It is recommended that participants attend or watch the recording of Webinar 1: The Market & Regulatory Drivers for Conservation Banking prior to attending this webinar. Live-captioning is available during the webinar at no cost to participants; to access please go to: https://www.captionedtext.com/client/event.aspx?EventID=4609198&CustomerID=321

Presenters:

Megan Callahan-Grant, NOAA National Marine Fisheries
Shauna Everett, US Fish & Wildlife Service
Deblyn Mead, Bureau of Land Management
Jennifer Oelke-Farley, US DOD Naval Facilities Engineering Command
Jeff Phillips, US Fish & Wildlife Service
Heather Richards, The Conservation Fund

 


 

WEBINAR #8: Alternatives to Banking (Part II) – Emerging Applications at the Cutting-Edge

Wednesday, January 27, 2021
2:00 – 4:00 PM Eastern / 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Pacific


The second of a two-part series on alternative compensatory mitigation tools, this webinar will feature a survey of cutting-edge examples of compensatory mitigation approaches that are supporting the recovery of species and habitats in new and exciting ways.  

It is recommended that participants attend or watch the recording of Webinar 1: The Market & Regulatory Drivers for Conservation Banking prior to attending this webinar. Live-captioning is available during the webinar at no cost to participants; to access please go to: https://www.captionedtext.com/client/event.aspx?EventID=4609200&CustomerID=321

Presenters:

Megan Callahan-Grant, NOAA National Marine Fisheries
Shauna Everett, US Fish & Wildlife Service
Deblyn Mead, Bureau of Land Management
Jennifer Oelke-Farley, US DOD Naval Facilities Engineering Command
Jeff Phillips, US Fish & Wildlife Service
Heather Richards, The Conservation Fund


 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

All webinars will be recorded and uploaded to this website. Check back often for updates to session content, presenter bios, and accompanying session resources for download! For more information about the webinar series, please contact Katie Allen (kallen@conservationfund.org).

This webinar series is complementary to the annual National Conservation Banking Training Course tentatively scheduled for September 27 – October 1, 2021 at the National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, WV. Save the date and look for updates in January on the Upcoming Trainings page!

THANK YOU TO OUR PARTNERS

This webinar series is sponsored by the US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Department of Agriculture, and Federal Highway Administration with supporting partnership from the Bureau of Land Management, US Army Corps of Engineers, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, and the Ecological Restoration Business Association.

The Market & Regulatory Drivers for Conservation Banking

Presented live on October 14th 2020, this session provides an overview of environmental markets and the drivers for Conservation Banking as a market-based tool. Presenters outline what conservation and joint banking is within the regulatory context, summarize the required documentation for conservation banking enabling instruments, and provide an overview of conservation banking practices – past, present, and future – across the United States.

Webinar recording



Presenters:

Webinar Materials:


Resources:

  1. Carreras Gamarra, Maria Jose and Theodore Toombs. Thirty years of species conservation banking in the US: Comparing policy to practice. Biological Conservation. 2017. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  2. DOI Office of Policy Analysis. “A Preliminary Analysis of the Conservation Banking Program and Results from a Survey of USFWS Staff.” September 2013. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  3. DOI Office of Policy Analysis. “Conservation Banking Overview and Suggested Areas for Future Analysis.” September 2013. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  4. DOI Office of Policy Analysis. “Results from a Survey of Conservation Banking Sponsors and Managers.” September 2016. 
  5. Ecosystem Marketplace. 2017. State of Biodiversity Markets. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  6. Madsen, Becca et al. “State of Biodiversity Markets: Offset and Compensation Programs Worldwide” 2010. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  7. NOAA NMFS Southwest Region. “Guidance for the review, establishment, use and operation of conservation banks and in-lieu fee mitigation programs” issued October 19, 2011. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  8. NOAA NMFS West Coast Region. West Coast Region Conservation Banking, Joint Banking, and In-Lieu Fee Program Tips and Tools, issued March 12, 2019 [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  9. NOAA NMFS West Coast Region. “West Coast Region Conservation Banking Guidance,” issued August 2015. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  10. Pindilli, Emily and Frank Casey. Biodiversity and Habitat Markets: Policy, Economic, and Ecological Implications of Market-Based Conservation. USGS, 2015. 
  11. Ribaudo, Hansen, Hallerstein, Greene. “The Use of Markets to Increase Private Investment in Environmental Stewardship” USDA, Economic Research Service, Report No. 64, September 2008. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  12. Salzman et al. 2018. The global status and trends of Payments for Ecosystem Services. Nature Sustainability 1:136-144. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  13. USACE and EPA. Compensatory Mitigation for Losses of Aquatic Resources. Final rule. Federal Register. Vol. 73, No. 70: pp. 19594-19705. April 2008. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  14. USFWS. Guidance for Establishment, Use, and Operation of Conservation Banks, issued May 8, 2003, 68 Fed. Reg. 24753. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  15. Wilkinson, McElfish, Kihslinger, Bendick, McKenney: “The Next Generation of Mitigation: Linking Current and Future Mitigation Programs with State Wildlife Action Plans and Other State and Regional Plans” ELI, Aug. 4, 2009. [DOWNLOAD PDF]

Web Resources:

BANKING PERSPECTIVES: THE BUSINESS OF BUYING & SELLING CREDITS

Presented live on October 21st 2020, this webinar provides an overview of the business of compensatory mitigation banking with insight into the risks that factor into the decision to sponsor a bank. Complementary to the presentation on the business of banking is a panel of private bankers and representatives from of credit buying agencies and organizations for a round-table discussion on current issues, emerging trends in credit supply and demand, and overcoming barriers to entering a market or using banking as tool.

WEBINAR RECORDING



Presenters:


WEBINAR MATERIALS:


RESOURCES:

  1. BenDor, T. K., J. A. Riggsbee, M. Doyle. 2011. Risks and markets for ecosystem services. Environ. Sci. and Tech. 45:1032-10330 [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  2. BenDor, T. K., J. A. Riggsbee, G. Howard. 2010. A survey of mitigation banker perceptions and experiences. National Wetlands Newsletter. 32(3):11-15. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  3. Denisoff, C. R. “Business Considerations”. Pp. 109-126, In: N. Carroll, J Fox and R. Bayon (eds). Conservation and Biodiversity Banking: a Guide to Setting up and Running Biodiversity Credit Trading Systems. Earthscan. 2008. 
  4. Denisoff, Craig and Greg DeYoung. “The Challenge of Implementing Market-Based Programs by Regulatory Agencies.” National Wetlands Newsletter, Vol. 33, No. 4 (2011). [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  5. Hook and Shadle. 2013. Navigating Wetland Mitigation Markets: A Study of Risks Facing Entrepreneurs and Regulators.32pp. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
  6. Levrel, H., P. Scemama, A-C. Vaissiere. 2017. Should we be wary of mitigation banking? Evidence regarding the risks associated with this offset arrangement in Florida. Ecol. Economics.135: 136-149. [DOWNLOAD PDF]
As the hub of the Balancing Nature & Commerce Community of Practice, this page features new tools, resources, and innovative strategies being implemented across the nation that can support your own efforts! If you’d like to receive news items like these in a periodic e-newsletter, please contact Katie Allen! Please also share your own experiences, exciting accomplishments, and/or resources that may benefit others!

Rural Community Highlight

Haysi, Virginia — Where Your Break Begins

Set in rural southwest Virginia, the gateway to Breaks Interstate Park, Haysi is a little place with a lot going for them.  The Crooked Road Heritage Music Trail, The Virginia Coal Heritage Trail, Rivers to Ridges Artisan Trail, Round the Mountain Artisan Network, 76 Bicycle Route and Great Eastern Trail all link to downtown Haysi as well as many other communities–but yet Haysi was not realizing the potential of having thousands of visitors pass through every year.  

In 2011, The Conservation Fund and the National Trust for Historic Preservation, provided Haysi with a recommendations report for improvements the town can make to bolster tourism development, create jobs, and define a sense of identity. 

Since the assessment, Haysi has been hard at work. They will soon begin work on building facade improvements, streescape improvements and constructions of a Riverfront Trail–all part of their downtown revitalization plan. As a place where all trails converge, the town designated their old theater building as The Russell Fork Trail Center to support the trails and house businesses.

“I have found that its best for us to get involved regionally, working with other localities, agencies to get the most out of the time I have to work on tourism development.” -Mayor of Haysi, Larry Yates

Check out Haysi at their new website: http://www.haysivirginia.gov/.

Funding Opportunities
Are you looking to fund community projects in your area? Check here periodically for an updated list of national funding opportunities that you can use to enhance your rural community.

Publications & Resources
Look here for new publications, websites, and tools that are available to assist you in your rural community’s planning and project delivery.