TCF in the News

August 3, 2016
Mike Ross & Dan Carpenter, KTUU, 3 August 2016 – A Hydroelectric dam built on the Eklutna River in 1929 will be demolished next year and after many years of discussion, planning and permitting the actual site work has begun.

“Part of this is to restore the salmon, part of this is to restore Dena’ina culture. The Dena’Ina People have given a lot to Anchorage so this is a way to give back and help restore the namesake river,” said Brad Meiklejohn, the Alaska State Director of the Conservation Fund.

READ MORE
August 3, 2016
Beth De Bona, Times-News, 3 August 2016 – A new “adventure accommodation” set to open this fall in Saluda aims to combine hip style with a historic atmosphere.

The Blue Firefly Inn is in the capable hands of Alexis Deal, probably best known for designing the interiors of Dandelion Cafe, West First and the Flat Rock Bakery.

READ MORE
August 3, 2016
David Cobb, Chattanooga Times Free Press, 3 August 2016 – Nature enthusiasts should go ahead and familiarize themselves with the name Denny Cove, because the 685-acre parcel of Marion County wilderness will soon be a staple of Southeast Tennessee's outdoor lexicon.

The Access Fund and Southeast Climbers Coalition announced their acquisition of the property on Monday and are diving immediately into a work list that could turn the area into one of the region's premier rock climbing destinations.

READ MORE
July 27, 2016
Louise Wrege, Harbor Country News, 27 July 2016 – The search for how human waste is ending up in Lake Michigan got a little help recently from two four-legged “detectives.”

Kenna, a golden retriever, and Sable, a German shepherd mix, from Environmental Canine Services in East Lansing and Maine, spent a week sniffing out the sources of the waste in several small streams between Stevensville and the Indiana line.

READ MORE
July 27, 2016
Coustal Courier, 27 July 2016 – McIntosh Sustainable Environment and Economic Development, based in Darien, has received a grant from the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities to implement the Sustainable Forestry and African-American Land Retention program.  

This program is an effort to promote forest health and productivity and to help stem the loss of African-American-owned rural land.

READ MORE
July 18, 2016
Karen Chavez, Asheville Citizen-Times, 18 July 2016 – The Conservation Trust for North Carolina recently purchased the 50-acre Open Branch Headwaters property in Jackson County adjoining the Blue Ridge Parkway, which will soon be part of a brand new park within the parkway.

The property, near Parkway Milepost 452, three miles north of Waterrock Knob, rises to 5,400 feet in elevation and contains rare spruce-fir habitat and provides important watershed and viewshed protection.

READ MORE
July 18, 2016
Lisa P. Jackson, GreenBiz, 18 July 2016 – Editor’s note: The following is excerpted from a speech, as prepared for delivery, given Friday by Lisa P. Jackson, vice president, environment, policy and social initiatives  at Apple, to Law Seminars International’s Natural Resource Damages Conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico. It was the first time Apple has talked publicly about the legal construct of its forestry projects, both in the United States and China.

We believe paper, like energy, can be a renewable resource. So we’re constantly looking for ways to lower the paper footprint that we use in our packaging. And we’ve made a commitment to zero out that impact by using paper more efficiently, increasing recycled paper content and sourcing paper sustainably..

READ MORE
July 16, 2016
Opinion by Bill Holman, The Charlotte Observer, 16 July 2016 – One hundred years ago this month, one of the worst natural disasters in our region’s history devastated communities from Asheville to Fort Mill. The Great Flood of 1916 was the result of two hurricanes saturating the Southern Appalachian Mountains and causing the Catawba and French Broad Rivers to dramatically overflow. Landslides swept away homes, dams burst, lives were lost, railroad and highway bridges vanished, lumber and textile mills were destroyed and the Lake Wylie dam collapsed.

In addition to the tremendous rains, a rapid land use change – the loss of forested watersheds – greatly aggravated the damage.

READ MORE